A Cable Car Conspiracy?

On Monday May 22nd, Scarborough’s brand new North Bay chairlifts suffered what initially appeared to be a minor setback.

Above: A leaflet for the zoo advertises the new chairlifts (Stories From Scarborough Image Archive)

A bizarre malfunction briefly hospitalised four adults and two young children, passengers on the cable car system that connected Scarborough Zoo and Marineland with the North Bay Promenade.

The exact details of the accident were murky from the outset. Passengers, witnesses and those responsible for the chairlifts all disagreed as to what happened. It seemed that one car, carrying a Mr and Mrs Thompson (who were staying at Colley’s Holiday Camp in Scarborough) slid backwards, knocking into another car and the chairlift station below. This was followed by another car, carrying Mr and Mrs Child (from Dringhouses, York) and their children Sarah and Michael, aged five and eight respectively. Varying accounts describe passengers flung from the chairlifts, suspended in precariously rocking carriages, and in some accounts the cable car partially, if not fully, came away from the cable that carried it.

Above: The original North Bay chairlifts (from the author’s collection)

The only certain facts were that the two women mentioned above – Mrs Child and Mrs Thompson – sustained greater injuries than their partners and children (to the back and chest respectively), and all concerned were treated for shock.

However, the accident and its coverage in local press uncovered a can of worms for Scarborough Zoo.

Zoo director Don Robinson stressed that the cable cars did not and could not escape the cable – in this case, he argued, they merely slipped backwards. However, he did not take the incident lightly, and the system engineer, Norman Dicken, travelled from Sheffield to inspect the chairlifts. His company, McKenna & Sons, had created the infrastructure, and he reported the following:

Yesterday one of the cars slipped on the bottom section, but we have not found the cause. The people were rocked about quite alot.

(Mr Dicken, quoted in the Scarborough Evening News, May 23rd, 1972)

No one was able to discover any fault with the chairlifts, in spite of numerous tests on the system, during which bags of sand were used to simulate the presence of passengers.

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Above: The chairlifts were later revamped several times, changing shape and colour (from the author’s collection)

Following the accident, a number of witnesses came forward with further information. Mrs B. Patrickson (from Sheffield) was staying with her family at one of the North Bay Chalets at the time of the incident, and watched the events unfold. She claimed that after the chair carrying the Thompsons slipped, the Child family, whose car was further up the cable, were:

…stuck in the car for twenty minutes, several pylons up after the first car accident

Then…

The second car slipped back down the cable, hit part of the support, and came right off the cable, falling to the ground and throwing the four people [the Child family] out.

(Quoted in the Scarborough Evening News, May 24th, 1972)

This version of events was further supported by a Mrs Rickatson and her son Neil, the former adding:

…it was completely untrue to say that the car did not come off the cable. [We] saw it happen.

(Quoted in the Scarborough Evening News, May 24th, 1972)

To make matters worse, another witness came forward to describe an earlier accident. Mrs V. Simmonds (of Scarborough) reported that on Sunday April 9th, during the early days of operation, her two sons, daughter in law and granddaughter also suffered an accident whilst riding the chairlifts to the zoo.

The car slipped off the cable and ran back to the starting station, damaging the railings and the car. This was all kept very hush, and nothing was done about it. It ought to be looked into before a serious accident occurs involving someone’s life.

(Quoted in the Scarborough Evening News, May 25th, 1972)

This ‘first’ accident was brought to the attention of Scarborough’s then Safety Officer by two witnesses, but was dismissed on the grounds that the lift had passed all safety tests. Apparently nothing was found wrong after this initial incident, and owner Don Robinson was reportedly unaware of this earlier accident.

So what became of the chairlifts?

The last report stated that the ride would be closed for further tests, and whilst no date of reopening was mentioned in subsequent weeks, the chairlifts went on to enjoy nearly thirty years of operation. You can still see the struts today. Were the accidents merely flukes? Was a secret problem fixed? The 1972 cable car malfunction remains an unsolved mystery.

Did you ride the chairlifts? Do you remember any accidents or faults? What do you think the explanation might be for this strange little story?

Sources

All information in this post was obtained from old copies of local newspapers held in the Scarborough Room at Scarborough Library.

A Rocky Start For Scarborough Zoo

In the summer of 1969 a brand new attraction opened in Scarborough.

Above: One of the earliest adverts for Scarborough Zoo (Stories From Scarborough Image Archive)

Scarborough Zoo was located on the top of the hill behind the Open Air Theatre seating area, and was accessible by a road opposite the miniature railway station in Northstead Manor Gardens. Previously known as Tennis Court Road, this path had once led to little-used tennis courts, utilised occasionally by schoolchildren completing their cycling proficiency tests. The courts were widely regarded as a white elephant, and unsurprisingly council officials reportedly welcomed the Scarborough Zoo redevelopment plans – the man behind them, Don Robinson, promised a mini-Disneyland for Scarborough.

Construction began at the end of 1968. However, the June opening in 1969 was beset with all kinds of unusual problems.

1) An Escape

Scarborough Zoo hit the news before the attraction had even opened. Sammy the sea-lion; one of the park’s new imports, made a daring escape into the North Sea, evading capture for several weeks.

2) An Injury

A 3 year-old girl from Rotherham fell twenty feet from a thirty five foot slide in the recently opened park, ahead of the official opening the following Saturday. Fortunately young Jane West was not seriously injured, although a visit to nearby Scarborough Hospital was necessary. However, Don Robinson was quick to point out that the safety of the slide was not in question:

In one playground in Holland last year more than a million children used one of these slides without one accident. They have been using these big slides there for a long time.

(Don Robinson, quoted in the Scarborough News, June 11th, 1969)

He also emphasised that parents and riders needed to use the slide responsibly.

In actual fact, what happened yesterday was that the girl went down on her father’s lap. That is how she came to fall off. I would not blame the father: he was understandably very upset. It was just unlucky. The slide is not designed for children to go down on their parents’ laps.

(Don Robinson, quoted in the Scarborough News, June 11th, 1969)

Following the incident a notice was erected advising slide riders to adopt suitable sitting positions for their downward journeys. It is difficult to imagine an incident like this today occurring without an accompanying lawsuit by the parents of the injured party.

3) A Death

Only days before the official opening of Scarborough Zoo, one of its soon-to-be residents died before even arriving at the park. An unnamed dolphin from Miami, US, died whilst travelling from London to Scarborough. The unfortunate animal’s American trainer, Jon Keller, noted that the dolphin’s condition had been considerably weakened by high altitudes experienced during the Transatlantic flight. Hoping to draw attention away from the tragedy (and any negative feeling towards the zoo this might have incurred), Don Robinson was quick to point out the favourable condition of a second dolphin who had also made the same journey.

Within three or four minutes of being put in the pool he was feeding out of his trainer’s hand and Mr Keller thought this was very unusual as they usually take several hours to become established in strange surroundings.

(Don Robinson, quoted in the Scarborough News, June 11th, 1969)

Times have changed considerably since these distant days. It is now more widely recognised that animals have complex needs, and that captivity can cause distress and ill health.

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Above: A performing dolphin at the zoo (from the author’s personal collection)

4) A Carnival

Unfortunate events may have given Scarborough Zoo some bad press, but perhaps it was better than no press at all. The opening of the zoo seemed, according to a study of local newspapers in May/June 1969, to be overshadowed by coverage and anticipation of the summer carnival in Scarborough. Then known as the Benelux Festival, this colourful event celebrated flowers, Scarborough and the town’s relationship with Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg.

Nonetheless, Scarborough Zoo officially opened on Saturday June 14th 1969 (although judging from earlier articles some visitors had been admitted in the preceding week also) Alongside the Mayor, Mayoress and selected officials, 400 excited children from nearby Northstead School got the chance to be amongst the first ‘official’ visitors to the attraction. Mr Robinson’s son had attended the school, prompting its special selection.

In spite of everything, Scarborough Zoo and Marineland was a long-running success. Even after the animals moved out in the 1980s, a rebranding as an amusement park (known as Marvel’s) in 1984 ensured nearly two further decades of business for the attraction, which eventually closed in 2002. Mr Robinson’s ‘mini-Disneyland’ is little more than a memory today, but if you look closely at the overgrown wasteland of modern times, there are hints of the former attraction hiding behind weeds and broken glass.

Did you ever visit Scarborough Zoo? Do you remember the sea lions or the dolphins? Perhaps you rode the slide that Jane West fell from? Please share your stories or get in touch.

Sources

All of the research in this post comes from old editions of local newspapers held at the Scarborough Room in Scarborough Library.

 

Scarborough’s North Bay Chairlifts

Scarborough’s North Bay chairlifts transported holidaymakers to the town’s Marineland and Zoo (later Marvel’s Amusement Park) between 1972 and 2002. Although the Zoo opened in 1969, the chairlifts took a little longer to arrive. When they did, the first passengers embarked at a small station close to the beach, and paid a small fee to ascend (or descend) the hill behind the Open Air Theatre in Northstead Manor Gardens.

Above: The North Bay chairlift route (source)

At the summit were animals – dolphins, bears, parrots and more. When the site was renamed Marvel’s Amusement Park in 1984, the zoo was replaced by a multitude of rides, and in the mid 1990s a second chairlift departure point was added at Peasholm Gap – squeezed between Water Splash World (later Atlantis) and the entrance to Manor Gardens.

Above: The new chairlift route is mentioned on the right (source)

Local businessman and Scarborough Zoo creator Don Robinson was the man behind Scarborough’s chairlifts. Indeed, cable car rides had become a popular addition to UK seaside resorts from the 1960s, and after the zoo opened in 1969, Robinson was keen to capitalise on this. Yet in order to understand their appeal and development, it is necessary to look even further back.

Above: The first chair lift at Sun Valley, Idaho, with designer James Curran (source)

Airborne cable car systems were originally designed for skiing enthusiasts. The development of ski lifts, which began in the 1930s, enabled skiers to travel to the tops of mountains more efficiently and effortlessly than was possible on foot. Funnily enough the single rider lift was based on devices that unloaded bananas from cargo ships! The first functioning design was, according to the sources viewed, designed by American James Curran, and was installed at Sun Valley – a resort town in Idaho (US).

Above: Examples of cargo conveyer devices upon which the first chair lifts were based (source)

These new chairlifts were typically installed at ski resorts, and it was not until the 1960s that they became more widely popular, largely assisted by new ‘gondola’ designs that enabled several riders to board a single lift. These new developments occurred in the late 1960s, by which point chairlifts began appearing across the UK at various resorts and tourist destinations.

Above: One of the early chair lift models at Alton Towers in the UK (source)

Alton Towers had chairlifts from 1963, and the company that provided them – the London Company of British Chairlifts Ltd (a subsidiary of British Ropeway Engineering Company Ltd) – also supplied a number of popular tourist destinations, including many of the Butlins camps. The camp at Filey, only a few miles from Scarborough, also boasted its very own set of chairlifts.

Above: Former chairlifts at Butlins in Filey (source)

The popular chairlift systems were thought to add an exotic, sophisticated and perhaps continental flavour to British resorts. Certainly these airborne cable cars conjured up images of Alpine (or American) adventures, stunning panoramas and dramatic heights. However, whilst Scarborough’s views are certainly worthy of great praise, the hill ascended by its chairlifts was far removed from the mountains of Switzerland for instance, or even some of the dramatic routes taken by other UK-based chairlift systems.

Above: An impressive view from the chairlifts at Butlins Pwllheli in the 1970s (source)

It is not known if the British Ropeway Engineering Company Ltd supplied Scarborough’s original system, although it has been reported that the structure and cable cars were constructed in Sheffield, before being transported in pieces and re-assembled on site. Furthermore, the cabin styling and colouring changed several times during the duration of the attraction.

Above: The early chairlifts were similar to the ones above, pictured at Alton Towers (source)

This initial, box-like design gave way to a more minimal, curving structure – similar to the Skyride at Pleasureland, Southport and the system at Butlins in Skegness.

Above: The former Skyride at Southport (source)

Below: Similar designs at Butlins in Skegness (source)

Like those pictured above, Scarborough’s chairlifts were initially multi-coloured. The Marvel’s rebranding of 1984, in line with its American theme, gave the cars a red hue. The newer alternative route – introduced in the 1990s –  was painted green.

Above: The red route at Scarborough (from the author’s personal collection)

The UK still boasts a number of operational cable car systems, suggesting that there is still a demand for this kind of ride, particularly when impressive views are involved.

Above: The cable cars in Llandudno are still in operation (source)

Dreamland, in Margate, collects, restores and re-imagines former rides and paraphernalia – its collection includes the chairlifts from Pleasureland in Southport, which were similar in design to Scarborough’s own. It is reassuring to know that projects such as this are working hard to preserve the rich heritage of UK attractions. Sadly it is too late for Scarborough’s chairlifts, and the rides at Marvel’s, which have long gone following the park’s closure in 2002.

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Above: The site shortly after most of the main structures were cleared (source)

The mild hill behind the Open Air Theatre makes any potential resurrection of the chairlifts an overly optimistic endeavour. Even back in the 1970s, Don Robinson noted that the novelty of riding them seemed to wear off quickly, with many passengers opting to walk back from the attraction, rather than take the chairlift both ways. Yet it is the chairlifts, or rather the remnants, that endure today, the rusting structures still standing tall against the North Bay skyline.

You can read about one reader’s chairlift memory here, and another here. Maybe you’d like to share a memory of your own? If so, please do get in touch.

Sources

Butlins Memories

Cableway Information Page

The World’s First Chair Lift

Dreamland

Alton Towers History

Please see other posts about Marvel’s and Scarborough Zoo for further sources used.

Scarborough Zoo: Did You Know…?

Scarborough Marineland and Zoo operated between 1969 and 1984, and was located on the top of the hill behind the Open Air Theatre seating in Northstead Manor Gardens. The remains of its successor, Marvel’s Amusement Park (which retained many of the zoo’s rides and features, minus the animals) can still be seen today, although the site is derelict.

The following post is the third in a series, which brings together some of the shorter facts and stories about former Scarborough attractions. You can see the previous two on the links below:

Scarborough Aquarium: Did You Know…?

Gala Land: Did You Know…?

So without any further ado, did you know that…

1) Scarborough Zoo was built on tennis courts

Before Scarborough Zoo was built, the site was home to a large number of tennis courts and a small cafe. By the 1960s these courts were falling into disrepair, although they were also used by local schools, to carry out cycling proficiency tests. You can see the old courts on the map below:

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Above: Map of Northstead (from the author’s collection)

2) A dolphin died

Various animals made the long journey to Scarborough, to be part of the zoo. Dolphins were amongst them, and were transported all the way from the US, which must have been an arduous and stressful journey for these seafaring mammals. So much so that one died after the long expedition – from New York to Britain by plane. The surviving dolphins, named Mo, Jenky and Artie stayed in a specially adapted building during the colder months – zoo staff did not want to risk another death by flying them to warmer climes abroad.

Above: One of the zoo’s performing dolphins (source)

Today, the captivity of dolphins and other marine mammals is considered potentially detrimental. Highly social and intelligent creatures, better suited to vast expanses of ocean than cramped tanks and enforced public performances, dolphins and the like are now much less likely to be seen in smaller venues (although bigger parks such as SeaWorld still recruit them).

3) The chairlifts were made in Sheffield

Originally titled  as the ‘cabin lifts’ the chair lifts were constructed in Sheffield, before the parts were transported to Scarborough and put together – rather like a giant jigsaw puzzle. The construction schedule overran, and the chairlifts ended up making a late appearance, opening on May 5th, 1972. Back then the ride was known as the Commando Cable Way.

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Above: The original chair lifts (from the author’s collection)

The opening was conducted by Mrs Sheila Smith of Avoncroft Hotel, the recently selected ‘most lovable landlady in Britain’ by a BBC programme. There was a jazz band playing, and a steamer called ‘Pride of New Orleans’ was also launched on the same day.

4) There was a special North Sea Fish Tank

This contained species local to the North Yorkshire coast, including skate, cod, whiting, mackerel, crabs and lobsters. Not far from the fish tank, was a farmyard, where children were able to milk and feed goats, alongside other domesticated animals.

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Above: The farmyard is shown on the left of the postcard (from the author’s collection)

5) The Zoo was officially opened on June 14th, 1969

Mayor and Mayoress Councillor and Mrs Norman Fuller conducted the ceremony at 11am, after which the zoo was opened to the public at 12am. Entry was charged at 4/6 for adults and 1/6 for children, with the venue proving to be an enormous success – 20, 000 visitors within the first two weeks!

Above: The zoo site (source)

6) The chimpanzees had a tantrum

In 1975 the UK was in the grips of a sugar shortage; a situation which did not go down well with Scarborough’s three chimpanzees, according to this article. Due to the crisis in supply, their keeper was forced to reduce the sugar content of the chimpanzees’ nightly cocoa treat.

“They didn’t take it at all kindly,” zoo owner Don Robinson said. “Smashing mugs, drenching their keeper – for a while there we were awash in cocoa.”

(source)

The chimpanzees would, during the 1970s, perform tea parties for zoo visitors – such a spectacle would be considered ethically questionable today, and perhaps the anger shown by the animals was not just a reflection of their fondness for sweet treats.

7) Visitors could go inside a Magic Mountain

The mountain was one of the zoo’s large fibreglass constructions, which also included large dinosaurs. The mountain contained models, including a town, fairground, toymaker and his toys, according to articles viewed in the Scarborough Room at Scarborough Library. Other quirky features of Don Robinson’s ‘mini Disneyland’ included a teddybears’ picnic, chihuahua show, and a rotating barrel ride. Dick and Dottie, the musical geese, also starred, alongside a parade of penguins.

Scarborough Marineland and Zoo boldly declared itself The Happiest Place In The North, on its promotional material. But was it? Do you remember the zoo? Please comment or get in touch if you do.

Most of the information in this post was sourced from material held at the Scarborough Room at Scarborough Library; particularly old articles from the Scarborough News and the Doris & Cyril Prescott Collection. See other links in the post for further references.

Marvellous Images (Of Marvel’s)

Marvel’s Amusement Park is the most popular attraction on Stories From Scarborough; or rather it seems to attract the most clicks from curious visitors. You can read more about the site and its history by visiting the following links:

Marvel’s Amusement Park (brief history and introduction)

Scarborough Zoo And Marineland (pre-Marvel’s history)

Thrill Seeking At Marvel’s And Scarborough Zoo (rides at the park)

Marvel’s Now (current status of the site)

Memories From Marvel’s (Mark’s memories of the attraction)

For everyone who is curious about Marvel’s, this post offers more clues as to what the park once looked like, starting with the enticing adverts that brought visitors in their thousands.

All images in this post have been kindly donated by Leonie, who also shared these images of the Millennium Experience, and this video of Atlantis. More of her collection can be viewed on the new Stories From Scarborough Flickr Page. See the disclaimer for copyright regulations.

Above: Newspaper article from 1995 (source)

On the top left are the famous chairlifts. The chairlifts were originally proposed during the early days of Scarborough Zoo, which opened in 1969, but numerous delays meant that they didn’t take any passengers until 1972. Once painted in a multitude of colours, they were later colour coded red (for the North Sands route) and green (for the newer Peasholm Gap route).

Above: Promotional design from 1995 (source)

The colourful pictures in this poster contrast sharply with the overgrown ruins that stand on the site today. It is barely even possible to guess where each feature stood, apart from the chairlifts – remnants of which can still be seen.

Above: The Smuggler’s Inn (source)

Below: Quad bike track and bouncy castle (source)

Images like these are crucial in ‘remembering’ the different parts of the former amusement park, which underwent several makeovers between the zoo years of 1969 – 1983, and the Marvel’s era of 1984 – 2002.

Above: A stunning view from the ‘red’ chairlifts in 1992 (source)

Apparently the chairlifts took more passengers to the park than they did away from it, a trend that initially puzzled founder Don Robinson during the early years of their operation in the 1970s. Perhaps the novelty quickly wore off? Nonetheless, there was always plenty to do once visitors arrived at the attraction.

Below: The Astroslide – one of the many features in 1992 (source)

Note the American flag – indeed, when Don Robinson originally proposed the development of this site, back in the late 1960s, he promised a mini-Disneyland, inspired by the blockbuster parks in the USA. Marvel’s original name was Marvel’s Showtime USA Fun Park. Stories From Scarborough also holds images of promotional material from the Scarborough Zoo era, but that will have to wait for another post!

Once again, thanks to Leonie for the photographs, and please do get in touch if this has triggered any memories. All contributions are welcome!

Please note that all images in this post are copyright protected via Stories From Scarborough – please read section 1 of the disclaimer to find out how to link to this material and how it may be used. It is important that all donated material is protected from improper or unauthorised use.

Thrill-seeking at Marvel’s and Scarborough Zoo

Marvel’s Amusement Park and its predecessor Scarborough Zoo featured a number of rides for thrill-seeking visitors.

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Above: A Marvel’s Poster featuring a list of rides (from the author’s personal collection)

The National Fairground Archive at the University of Sheffield, holds an impressive collection of photographs online, featuring many of the rides that once operated at both amusement park and zoo.

For digital security reasons these images cannot be reproduced here, although relevant links will be provided where appropriate.

One of the most prominent rides on the Marvel’s/Zoo site was The Big Dipper, not to be confused with the famous Big Dipper at Blackpool Pleasure Beach.

Below: The better known Blackpool Big Dipper – a very different ride (source)

The Scarborough Big Dipper was a much smaller model, which opened in 1973, as part of Scarborough Zoo. Manufactured by Pinfari, this ride, unlike its larger wooden Blackpool namesake, was made from steel.

You can view another image of the ride here, courtesy of the NFA Digital Archive at the University of Sheffield.

In 1999 the roller coaster was moved to Knowsley Safari Park, where it became known as Viper and operated between 2000 and 2006. Afterwards it may have been sold to a Spanish company, although confirmation of this has been difficult to find.

Above: The Viper logo (source)

Below: The ride at Knowsley Safari Park (source)

There was also a junior roller coaster for children, known as the Go-Gator, which ran from 1973 until 1999, just like the Big Dipper.

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Above: Go-Gator ride (from the author’s personal collection)

An alternative view of the ride can be seen here at the NFA Digital Collection, University of Sheffield.

Another steel ride, manufactured by Wisdom, the Go-Gator featured a gently undulating track, traversed via carriages that resembled a cartoon alligator. There are still a number in operation today.

Above: The Go-Gator at nearby Flamingoland (source)

Scarborough Zoo also built up a collection of fairground staples, which its later reincarnation – Marvel’s – inherited. These included:

Waltzers

Dodgems

Paratroopers

Jets

Click the links to see photos from the NFA Digital Archive – images cannot be used or reproduced unless permission has been granted from the NFA at the University of Sheffield. Many more can be found by typing ‘Scarborough’ into the search box.

Some bore the name of Scarborough Zoo’s founder, Don Robinson. Others had more creative names, such as Super Cyclone Twist, and Stargazer.

 

Above: Cardboard copy of the Stargazer sign (source)

When Marvel’s replaced Scarborough Zoo in 1984, the attraction focused more on rides and thrill-seeking than ever before. It’s new name (Mr Marvel’s Showtime USA Fun Park – quite a mouthful!) and those of the rides suggested a desire to emulate the success of famous US theme parks. Indeed, when Don Robinson first developed the site back in the late 1960s, he recalls being inspired by Disneyland.

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Above: Another Marvel’s poster (from the author’s personal collection)

In line with this American-style re-branding, the chairlifts – once painted in different colours – were re-painted in a vivid red, and the publicity material featured a cartoon character dressed in the stars and stripes of the USA (see above).

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Above: The red chairlift (from the author’s personal collection).

Thanks to this timely makeover, the park survived for just over another decade. But as before, with the zoo, visitors were eventually lured away by bigger and more impressive theme parks. Attractions such as nearby Flamingoland boasted huge and terrifying roller coasters that dwarfed the humble Big Dipper at Marvel’s. Other North Bay attractions were also struggling at this time – when Marvel’s closed in 2002, neighbouring attractions Kinderland and Atlantis were both descending into financial difficulties, and would each close down several years later.

Does this then mean that the local funfair or amusement park is dead?

Visitors haven’t completely abandoned smaller attractions. Luna Park –  the fair near Scarborough Harbour – still survives, and travelling funfairs continue to exist. However, committed adrenaline junkies are drawn in greater numbers to bigger, scarier rides in regional parks (and those abroad); attractions better equipped to invest in the newest and most advanced rides. Nonetheless, the older rides offer a quaint nostalgia for adult passengers, and an introduction for younger riders, eager to begin their thrill-seeking adventures. Unfortunately Marvel’s can only offer memories now – the derelict site has lost its once exciting rides, and with them, its former identity.

Do you remember the rides at Marvel’s or the Zoo? Were you a thrill-seeker? Or did you prefer the gentler attractions at the amusement park? Please leave comments/corrections below.

Sources

National Fairground Archive

Roller Coaster Database

Joyland Books

Urbex Forums

Scarborough News